The streets of tea in Sri Lanka

Have you ever imagined that the tea leaves, of which made ​​the famous Ceylon tea have played a surprisingly complex role in the history of Sri Lanka? Everything started with a plant Camellia sinesis, which came to China from the British in 1824, the island settlers, known as Ceylon in 1801. The plant is intended to be planted in the Royal Botanical Gardens outside of Kandy in the lush interior of the country, but has since evolved into an organized, export business with a profit of about 1.1 billion!

Sri Lanka tea

Sri Lanka tea

Apart from the economic benefit from growing Tragically in Sri Lanka, tea offers a unique travel experience for visitors who arrive from all over the world to discover from close secrets of this precious plant.

Sri Lanka tea leaves

Sri Lanka tea leaves

When in 1867 the Scottish farmer Brown, James Taylor, the man who could be recognized as the pioneer of the tea industry in Sri Lanka, decided to cultivate 19 acres of tea near Kandy, at an altitude of about 500 meters, few gave him importance, since the 60’s Sri Lanka were the largest coffee producer in the world.

Tea pluckers in Sri Lanka

Tea pluckers in Sri Lanka

Until 1890, when Thomas Lipton acquired tea estates in the region, about 23,000 tonnes of tea were exported to London. The Ceylon had become an island synonymous with the tea! According to the World Tea Council, 2012 Sri Lanka exported 340 million kgs of tea, ranking third in volume of tea, after Kenya and China!

Dilmah tea

Dilmah tea

The famous tea producer Dilmah, tea tasting sessions organized at its headquarters outside Colombo, the capital of the island, where visitors learn to discern the difference Maskeliya variety grown at low altitude, the Ran Watte, which grows to 1,829 measures.

View more here: The longest bridges in the world.

By Nicole P.

Sri Lanka tea photos: SimonQ, Emmanuel Catteau, Ruchira R, travellocal.

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