The most remote islands

Tired of traveling in Europe? Does Thailand, Bali and the Maldives not look quite adventurous destinations? Are you looking for landscapes sprinkled with lots of adventure and living conditions that differ greatly from the pools and spa of a luxury hotel? Here are four island destinations to help you escape completely. Each has its difficulties, of course, as they are the most remote island destinations on the planet.

Midway, Pacific Ocean

As its name implies, the island is located halfway from Japan to the U.S. west coast. This is an atoll with an area of ​​only 6.2 square kilometers. It is 5200 km from San Francisco and 4,100 km from Tokyo so you need a couple of days to reach from both places. There is no permanent population, but since 2008 some people operate seasonal tourist facilities. In 2012 the island was visited by 332 people who were informed about the rich underwater flora and fauna and the history of the place, which hosted the bloodiest battle of World War II.

Midway

Midway

Tristan Da Cunha, Atlantic

In this isolated archipelago there are no hotels, no airport, no restaurants, no jet skis, no organized beaches. For anyone traveling to these islands, which are acquired by the British in the 17th century, he must obtain a certificate from the British police and get approved by the Board of islands. With a population of just 275 residents, tourism is highly controlled. Once a month there is a sea route from Cape Town, South Africa and the ship needs six days to travel the 3,000 miles from the African coast.

Tristan da Cunha

Tristan da Cunha

Bear Island, Northern Frozen Ocean

The Norwegians, who owned the island, refer to it as Bjørnøya. It is the southernmost island of the archipelago of Svalbard, located nearly 600 kilometers north of the European mainland. The island has been declared a natural heritage site since 2002 and access to it is strictly controlled to protect tourists. The wreckage of a nuclear submarine, which was destroyed on the coast, is visible and is an impressive sight but even the levels of radioactivity in the surrounding area can be dangerous for everyone.

Bjørnøya (Bear Island)

Bjørnøya (Bear Island)

Bouvet, South Atlantic

The uninhabited island is only 1600 km from the Antarctic continent and is fairly the most isolated tourist destination in the world. Entirely covered by glaciers, it has been declared a protected natural destination so you need a special permit from the Norwegian government to step foot on it. Usually the only visitors it gets are on scientific missions but the research vessels that approach it frequently receive requests from eccentric tourists to travel with them. The disembarkation on the island, of course, can only be done by helicopter as there is no port.

Bouvet

Bouvet

Remote islands photos by: Ultrapanavision, bogdanovskaya, maurits heech, john nontague

By +Nikos Kontorigas

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