Lebanon | The real joy of life

Lebanon is a small country, you can easily get back from within a few days. In most known by the news, because the 15 year long civil war and the recent political developments. Once there, however, you will find that it is a very welcoming place that knows how to honor the joy of life. In particular the lifestyle of Beirut and nightlife are themselves a tourist brand. A city that moves always in a tightrope, who lives and literally merry like there is no tomorrow, perhaps because of the war, since  they are always five minutes away from the civil war.

Lebanon

Lebanon

American tanks and armed soldiers are part of the scene, while the buildings bearing strong marks of conflict. Make a walk on the seaside Corniche, spend an afternoon at La Plage, the Lebanese beauties to collect sun and sun beds looks on a seaside mansion that has been converted into a cafe/restaurant, walk reformed downtown, where you will find boutiques of Cartier, the Barneys Beirut and you will understand how deep is the hedonistic culture of the city.

Corniche

Corniche

The atmosphere is full of contrasts. The new next to the old, traditional next to funky. The Lebanese master the art of flirting and the art of clubbing, even if you consider yourself a shy guy, before you know it you find yourself eating dawn manais al zaatar which is pie with aromatic zatar. The source element is the great asset of Lebanese culture. Before visiting Lebanon, particularly the Hezbollah areas, check for any travel warnings.

Lebanon

Lebanon

In July is the Beirut International Jazz Festival and in August, the famed Baalpek festival. In October it is organized the Beirut International Film Festival, with films from all over the Middle East, mostly in Arabic or French, while in March-April the Francophone Film Festival is on. If you go in the middle of the winter, the ski resort of Faraya is extremely popular.

Beirut

Beirut

View more here: The old city of Jerusalem.

By Nicole P.

Lebanon photos: waleed hider, Claire Nguyen, Michael Grant, Hussein Moussa.

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